NCSO earns reaccreditation

Image
  • The Nassau County Sheriff’s Office recently received reaccreditation in multiple categories. Showing off the certifications are, from left, Nassau County Sheriff Bill Leeper, Detention Deputy Darren Lorenz, Communications Officer Alicia Waldron, Patrol Deputy Ivan Pinkston and NCSO Accreditation Manager Lawanna Ware.
    The Nassau County Sheriff’s Office recently received reaccreditation in multiple categories. Showing off the certifications are, from left, Nassau County Sheriff Bill Leeper, Detention Deputy Darren Lorenz, Communications Officer Alicia Waldron, Patrol Deputy Ivan Pinkston and NCSO Accreditation Manager Lawanna Ware.
Body

The Nassau County Sheriff’s Office recently earned accreditation in multiple categories, according to a news release from the law enforcement agency.

The Jail and Detention Facility was reaccredited for the fourth time by the Florida Corrections Accred-itation Commission. Law Enforcement Operations was reaccredited for the third time by the Commission for Florida Law Enforcement Accreditation. And the 911 Communications Division was reaccredited for the first time by the Florida Police Accreditation Coalition.

Sheriff Bill Leeper accepted all three accreditation certifications on behalf of each member of the Nassau County Sheriff’s Office. The certifications are good for the next three years.

“Maintaining accreditation status ensures the Nassau County Sheriff’s Office meets the highest professional standards set by the commissions,” Leeper said. “As sheriff of Nassau County, I will continue to work tirelessly to meet and exceed the high standards set by FCAC, CFA and FPAC to provide the citizens of Nassau County with professional, accountable, effective and efficient public safety services.”

Assessment teams from FCAC, CFA and FPAC conducted independent, intensive and thorough inspections of the NCSO operations, the news release said. The accreditation assessment examined all aspects of the sheriff’s office, including looking at policies and procedures, management, operations and support services, the release said.

“We must operate under accepted and contemporary standards and be ready for those unexpected problems. A professional law enforcement agency cannot have questionable practices,” Leeper said. “We must perform well, be trained well, practice sound ethics and have supervisory oversight of our operations and personnel, always remembering that excellence in policing is not granted on easy terms.”